Choosing the Seating For Your Home

We’ve all come across bad seating arrangements and uncomfortable furniture pieces when visiting people’s homes. Maybe you’ve sat on a chair that is so high the soles of your feet won’t even touch the floor. Or you might have tried to relax on a soft-looking chair, only to feel like you’re sinking into it.

To avoid this awkward situation in the interior design of your home, try these guidelines for choosing comfortable seating:

Seat Height

Seats that are too low cause the legs to push too far forward, and the back to slide away from the backrest.  This causes improper lumbar support.

Seat Depth

With deep seats, the seat front can press into the area behind the knee, and shallow seats sometimes give the sensation that you are falling off the front of the chair.

Seat Cushioning

Be careful not to choose excessively deep, soft cushioning, as it can be extremely uncomfortable despite its cozy look.

Some basic considerations for choosing chairs and other furniture for seating are seat height, seat depth and cushioning. Seats that are too low cause the legs to push too far forward, and the back to slide away from the backrest, causing improper lumbar support. With deep seats, the seat front can press into the area behind the knee, and shallow seats sometimes give the sensation that you are falling off the front of the chair. Be careful not to choose excessively deep, soft cushioning, as it can be extremely uncomfortable despite its cozy look.

Arranging the Seating

Seating selected and laid out by Peach Interior Design Vancouver

 

Each seat needs to have a table within reach. The table should be as tall as the arms of the piece of furniture it is serving. Side tables serve an important purpose – they’re not just for displaying picture frames and vases! There should be enough room on a side table for a beverage glass or a small serving plate.

For rooms where you engage in quiet conversation, don’t place pieces too far apart. Seats should be facing each other so guests can comfortably make eye contact. Create a conversation area, one that allows you to see everyone easily. Nothing is more awkward than a side-by-side arrangement of furniture that makes eye contact difficult.

When dining, you might think your table is large enough to squeeze two more chairs in, but considering human dimensions and body position, strive for an optimal seating width of 24-30 inches to give people room to move their elbows.

A Note About Views

Also, just because a room has a view doesn’t mean all the furniture should face the view. Guests won’t stare at the view all night as if they were at a movie theatre!